• Kathy Svetina

Traditional Marketing Strategies That Still Work in Today's Digital Age

From: "Help! My Business is Growing" Podcast


Traditional Marketing Strategies That Still Work in Today's Digital Age


As a business owner, more often than not, there is an unseen force compelling you to tie all your marketing efforts down to social media and all things digital.


However, it can get extremely overwhelming and somewhat daunting for even the most well-versed in digital marketing.


There seems to be a never-ending list of new tactics, platforms to embrace, and trends that appear overnight and then seem to die overnight too!


In today's fast-paced "there's-always-a-next-big-thing-in-digital-marketing" landscape, many of you have forgotten that some old-school marketing strategies still work too!


And amidst this chaotic digital age, specific tried and tested traditional strategies may be just as effective as some of today's new ideas.


So what are some examples of traditional marketing tactics you can use today to help grow your business?


In this episode of Help! My Business Is Growing; Nedra Rezinas and I chat about old-school or traditional marketing techniques worth taking a second look at.


We discuss how networking, referral marketing, and other non-social-media-heavy strategies can help you expand your reach, find new leads and grow your business.


Nedra Rezinas is a marketing consultant who helps service-based entrepreneurs learn to delegate and outsource to scale their business and do more work in their "zone of genius".


She has over 20 years of direct experience in marketing and online business, specializing in developing custom marketing strategies that attract high-value clients.




In this week's episode, we discuss:

  • 02:33 What are some other ways people can market themselves that aren't exclusively attached to social media or having a social media presence?

  • 05:10 What do you see that works for your clients who might not have that big of a social media presence?

  • 12:53 How important is CRM when it comes to marketing?

  • 18:49 What is referral partner marketing? What does that look like? What makes someone or a company/organization a good referral partner?

  • 36:51 If someone wants to move their marketing away from social media, what is the next, tangible step they can do in the next week or two to get them closer to all these "old-school, yet new-school, innovating tactics we discussed?


Transcript


Listen to the podcast here:




What do you see that works for your clients who might not have that big of a social media presence?


  • Focusing on Email marketing

This might not be the top of mind for many people, but email marketing is effective if done correctly.


  • Finding Referral partners

Connect with people in related fields and see how you can work together and collaborate to increase business for each other.


  • Good old Networking

If you like to meet and talk to people and share that instant energy, leverage your strength and network.



How important is CRM when it comes to marketing?


Despite our best efforts, we often fail to reach out promptly to our customers. Or we think we reached out to them in the past even though we did not.


Your CRM is critical to all your marketing efforts because it keeps you honest about:

  • what are you doing

  • what are you tracking

  • who do you need to reach out to

  • what progress have you made


It puts down in black and white whether you've reached out to someone.

You're sure of your next action because your past action is there, recorded in black and white.




CRMs are critical to helping you keep honest about what you're tracking, who you're reaching out to, and what progress you're making.





What is referral partner marketing? What does that look like? What makes someone or a company/organization a good referral partner?



Referral partner marketing is similar to referral marketing but with a twist.


Instead of incentivizing your past customers to spread the word about your product and services, you partner up with people who have similar clients and are doing something adjacent or complementary to what you do but are not competing with you.


Take some time to think about your client, and then think about who they're touching in their interactions. And those people could easily be your referral partners.


For example, if you are a personal organizer, your clients need to organize their homes or spaces because they usually go through a life transition. Maybe they are now empty nesters, moving houses, going through relationship changes, and more.


You can then talk to professional movers, realtors, counselors, divorce lawyers, and the like.

They can easily refer business to you and vice versa. You can also collaborate on a one-off project and grow the relationship.



 
"Think about what your client is going through, and then think about who they're touching as well in their interactions. [Those] could easily be your referral partners." - Nedra Rezinas
 


How do you go about finding these referral partners? What do you use? LinkedIn? Your local Chamber of Commerce? Where do you find them?



It will depend on your clients and what they are going through.


You need to identify who they will interact with and target them as potential referral partners.


Once you nail down who those referral partners are, you need to determine where they're hanging out. You can check:


  • LinkedIn

  • Association/Trade groups of that relevant industry

  • Networking groups


What is vital, however, is that you must share similar values with potential partners and check whether these groups and associations are well-run or legitimate.




Simply be a human with people. They appreciate it when you remember details about their own lives and actually connect with them.




If someone wants to move their marketing away from social media, what is the next, tangible step they can do in the next week or two to get them closer to all these "old-school, yet new school, innovating tactics we discussed?



Make a list of your audience and your core community and note:


  • Where do you speak or interact with them?

  • Who are they?

  • How can you contact them?


And slowly have them move into the spaces or platforms you'll be focusing on in the future, be it live events, webinars, podcasting, email marketing, and more.





We go in-depth with this topic and more over at the podcast. Listen here:



 

To Recap:


1. Email marketing, Referral partners, and Networking are great examples of effective, non-social-media-heavy marketing strategies.


2. CRM is crucial to all marketing efforts to keep you organized and track customer interactions which can impact your growth.


3. Referral partner marketing is finding people in complementary industries to whom you can collaborate and send potential leads and, hopefully, vice versa.


4. LinkedIn, Association/Trade groups, and Networking groups are great places to find referral partners but vet them thoroughly first.


5. Come up with a list of your current audience and community and slowly transition them to hearing from you on another platform or method if you want to start moving your business out of social media.


 

About Nedra Rezinas

Nedra Rezinas is a marketing consultant who helps service-based entrepreneurs learn to delegate and outsource to scale their business and do more work in their "zone of genius".


She has over 20 years of direct experience in marketing and online business, specializing in developing custom marketing strategies that attract high-value clients


Website - https://www.nedrarezinas.com/

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/nrezinas/


Other Resources Mentioned in the Episode:


CRMs

HubSpot

Zoho

Less Annoying CRM

Cloze


Audience Listening Tool

Spark Toro


Gifting Community

Gift.Grow.Win John Ruhlin | Giftology: The Art and Science of Using Gifts to Cut Through the Noise, Increase Referrals, and Strengthen Retention

 

by Kathy Svetina

Kathy is a Fractional CFO and the founder and director of NewCastle Finance LLC. She is a financial puzzle solver, focusing on women-owned businesses, and providing financial insights needed for a healthy and sustainable business.